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Your views on the plans for the old Cavendish site – a mixed reaction

PUBLISHED: 12:35 28 August 2018

The view from the promenade of the flats to be developed on the former Cavendish Hotel site in Felixstowe. Picture: LAST AND TRICKER PARTNERSHIP

The view from the promenade of the flats to be developed on the former Cavendish Hotel site in Felixstowe. Picture: LAST AND TRICKER PARTNERSHIP

Last and Tricker

Proposals to build 59 homes on land once occupied by one of Felixstowe’s best-known hotels and later used for markets has sparked an interesting debate.

How the former Cavendish Hotel site in Felixstowe, could be developed with apartments, townhouses and commercial units Picture: LAST AND TRICKER PARTNERSHIPHow the former Cavendish Hotel site in Felixstowe, could be developed with apartments, townhouses and commercial units Picture: LAST AND TRICKER PARTNERSHIP

Some people commenting on the Enjoy Felixstowe More Facebook page are in favour of development but the use of the prominent site for housing and the design approved for the six-storey buildings has not been popular with everyone.

Planning permission has been granted by Suffolk Coastal District Council for the project. The council had long expected an application for homes – it was not the first time such a scheme has been put forward in the past 30 years – and its policy has always been that commercial or tourism-related uses should occupy the ground floor. The approved plans meet these requirements.

Now the landowners have put the site, once occupied by the Cavendish Hotel, up for sale so the development can proceed.

On our Facebook site Barbara Seglie wrote about the approved plans: “This building is not in keeping with the area and dwarfs the neighbouring houses. Yes development but with style. A monstrosity ... traffic and parking problems ... small businesses in the area pushed out.

The Cavendish Hotel, Sea Road, Felixstowe, in 1987. The hotel opened in 1936 and was demolished in 1988 Picture: RUSSELL WHIPPSThe Cavendish Hotel, Sea Road, Felixstowe, in 1987. The hotel opened in 1936 and was demolished in 1988 Picture: RUSSELL WHIPPS

“I’d say the council cares little for the future of Felixstowe. Their development ideas show little interest in the progress our our beautiful Edwardian beachfront. Southwold would never approve of an building as unattractive as this. Very sad Indeed!”

Some people suggested Wetherspoons, who have permission to use the site of the old Central Surgery in the town centre for a pub and restaurant, could use one of the ground-floor units.

There is some concern over how much the flats will cost – especially those with panoramic sea views – and the lack of affordable homes in the plans. The developer will be asked to pay £350,000, which Suffolk Coastal will put towards an affordable homes scheme elsewhere in the town.

Terence Good said: “Anything is better than that eyesore at the moment, you’ll never get affordable homes at a prime site like this.”

Felixstowe's Cavendish Hotel in its hey day Picture: ARCHANT ARCHIVEFelixstowe's Cavendish Hotel in its hey day Picture: ARCHANT ARCHIVE

Julie Hassell said: “I agree with you a nice family friendly affordable hotel – only the rich and elite would be able to afford a flat in that location.”

Nicholas Thompson added: “Assuming wealthy people buy the apartments they will also spend money in the town to the benefit of local shops, restaurants, pubs etc. So it’s not all bad news.”

Stuart Daynes said: “The developers will do what anyone of us would do, they will get the highest price possible. And who can blame them? They are a business not a charity.”

The current plan is for 48 apartments, 11 townhouses and three commercial units on the ground floor which would most likely be shops, restaurant or leisure uses for the resort.

The land is a key development site – a few yards from the new Martello Park homes and park project, where plans have also been announced for a new beach cafe.

The Art Deco style Cavendish Hotel, built by Tolly Cobbold, was a landmark in Sea Road overlooking the beach, until it was demolished in 1988 after falling into disprepair.

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